Re: Models and texturing

#2
So you are wanting a complete tutorial, like say. Making a chair from scratch, and importing it into the engine, complete with physics?

If you are looking for something like that, it shouldn't be hard to find on youtube. Are you trying to find something more specific? Like a specific kind of asset? If so, I have been looking into making a set of tutorials on the basics of asset authoring for Cryengine.

Re: Models and texturing

#3
So you are wanting a complete tutorial, like say. Making a chair from scratch, and importing it into the engine, complete with physics?

If you are looking for something like that, it shouldn't be hard to find on youtube. Are you trying to find something more specific? Like a specific kind of asset? If so, I have been looking into making a set of tutorials on the basics of asset authoring for Cryengine.
Well, I wanted to get into making Buildings (Like residential Towns, Villages, Farm Styles etc), and some Car's (Abandoned ones as well as ones I am able to drive), and Maybe some Tree's, Fallen Tree's etc.

The ones I seem to find online are more aimed at Unity and Unreal engine more than anything.

~FInch
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Re: Models and texturing

#4
Oh my, those are all quite specific things. Each with their own sort of mindset. Buildings require a good grasp of scale, physical accuracy, and proportions. Tree's require a loooooot of practice and research to get right, and vehicles are all about cleanliness of geometry and accuracy.

So here is the thing, the reason I haven't really made an all inclusive Cryengine tutorial series yet, is that all the stuff you learn to make assets for other engines usually applies almost the same to any other engine, (Barring differences in shader type of course). The in-engine process is the part that is usually completely different.

Before I link you any tutorials, what program do you want to use to work on your assets?

Your choices are pretty much:

Blender, Maya, 3dsmax, Modo, Cinema 4D


If you want something to just kind of look through real quick here is a in-depth tutorial on making modular buildings:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APZ2kZ3OF1E

Re: Models and texturing

#5
Oh my, those are all quite specific things. Each with their own sort of mindset. Buildings require a good grasp of scale, physical accuracy, and proportions. Tree's require a loooooot of practice and research to get right, and vehicles are all about cleanliness of geometry and accuracy.

So here is the thing, the reason I haven't really made an all inclusive Cryengine tutorial series yet, is that all the stuff you learn to make assets for other engines usually applies almost the same to any other engine, (Barring differences in shader type of course). The in-engine process is the part that is usually completely different.

Before I link you any tutorials, what program do you want to use to work on your assets?

Your choices are pretty much:

Blender, Maya, 3dsmax, Modo, Cinema 4D


If you want something to just kind of look through real quick here is a in-depth tutorial on making modular buildings:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APZ2kZ3OF1E
I am able to use any, I have used all a few times for class projects, but looking for one where it might be easier if that makes sense.
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Re: Models and texturing

#6
For a general opinion, Maya is really solid for rigging and animation, but having used both Maya and Max in a professional work environment. I can tell you pretty much without any doubt that 3ds Max is still the modeling king. Though Maya 2017 has brought with it a number of max's tools, its still not quite there yet. I can still outpace even more experienced modelers using maya than me by almost double using max.

Honestly though, In the end I think learning both Max and Maya will help you out the most with getting a job in the industry if that is what you are looking for. If your looking just for getting your own stuff done, then maybe consider Modo since it is much much cheaper in general and has become a bit more common in the industry with concept artists, Illustrators, and some general practitioner modelers.

In the end its up to you, based on what you are wanting to accomplish over time as to what you will pick.

Re: Models and texturing

#7
For a general opinion, Maya is really solid for rigging and animation, but having used both Maya and Max in a professional work environment. I can tell you pretty much without any doubt that 3ds Max is still the modeling king. Though Maya 2017 has brought with it a number of max's tools, its still not quite there yet. I can still outpace even more experienced modelers using maya than me by almost double using max.

Honestly though, In the end I think learning both Max and Maya will help you out the most with getting a job in the industry if that is what you are looking for. If your looking just for getting your own stuff done, then maybe consider Modo since it is much much cheaper in general and has become a bit more common in the industry with concept artists, Illustrators, and some general practitioner modelers.

In the end its up to you, based on what you are wanting to accomplish over time as to what you will pick.
Thanks,

Although I am not in the Game Industry, I am in the Computer IT and Server Industry. This is for a side project of a game I am working on.

As program cost wise, I have all them free being a college student, and I am able to renew for free also.

~Finch
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Re: Models and texturing

#8
Then I suggest you go with what you are most comfortable with then. Exporting static geometry, mtls, ect is much easier from 3ds max, if your dealing with characters or rigged assets then Maya is a go-to.

Sorry cant be much more help than that with regards to that. The rest is just learning the Asset Creation process in your chosen programs.

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